What is Feet First Clinic ?

Feet First Clinic specializes in the treatment of acute and chronic conditions that affect the toes, feet, and ankles.

Don’t underestimate the importance of foot care. After all, your feet help you get from point A to point B and provide you with essential support. There’s a lot riding on your feet and a lot that can go wrong with them.

We specialize in feet, whether you need a one-time treatment or ongoing foot pain management. Our treatments and products help acute and chronic foot disorders that affect both foot and lower limb functions.

Corns

What Are Corns?

A corn is an area of hardened skin that develops on areas of the feet that sustain too much compression. Corns can develop on weightbearing areas of the feet or areas that don’t bear weight, such as on or in between the toes. Corns are often caused by ill-fitting footwear repeatedly rubbing against the toes.

What Are The Symptoms Of Corns?

Symptoms of a foot corn include:

  • A round, discoloured build up of hard skin surrounded by inflamed skin on the top of the toes or on the outer edge of the pinky toe
  • A build up of soft skin between toes
  • Can be painful when pressed against shoes, adjacent toes and the ground

How Do I Treat Corns?

Corns can be removed during an appointment with one of our foot specialists or chiropodists who will safely remove the build-up of tissue and assess whether orthopedic shoes or custom orthotics may be indicated to prevent their recurrence.

To schedule best foot care treatment with our licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).

Our Toronto foot clinic is open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm, Saturdays 10am-4pm. You do not need a referral to become a patient at our Foot clinic.

What Causes Corns?

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of developing corns:

  • Wearing shoes that are too tight
  • Wearing shoes that are too short
  • Wearing shoes without socks
  • Biomechanical problems when walking
  • Bony deformities or prominences in the feet
  • Systemic diseases that can cause increased build-up of hard skin

Corns are more common in individuals who have:

How Do I Prevent Corns?

The best way to prevent corns is to exercise proper foot care solutions which can be explained thoroughly with a foot specialist or Chiropodist. Properly fitted and custom orthotics and also accomplish significant difference in preventing corns.

Bunions

What Are Bunions?

A bunion, medically known as hallux valgus, is an angular boney protrusion that forms at the site of the large joint that connects your big toe to your foot. This joint, called the first metatarsophalangeal joint (or MTP joint for short)is a critical junction of bones, tendons, and ligaments that bear much of our weight when we’re on our feet: it carries up to 60% of our body weight when walking and up to 3X our body weight when jogging or running.

If an abnormality develops in the joint, the bones of the big toe and foot can deviate from proper alignment and create the characteristic angular protrusion that juts out from the base of the big toe.

Bunions are extremely prevalent: up to one in three people over the age of 18 have bunions and are more common in women.

What Are The Symptoms Of Bunions?

Bunions are a progressive disorder that develop slowly over time. The earliest symptom is the gradual inward deviation of the big toe toward the other toes. As the foot condition advances you may experience:

  • A prominent bony bump at the base of the big toe
  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain when walking or when pressure is applied to the bunion
  • Diminished range of motion

How Do I Treat Bunions?

The goal of treatment for bunions is practicing proper foot care solutions to resolve foot pain and allowing normal activity. While bunions cannot be corrected without surgery, in most cases bunion symptoms can be effectively managed with non-operative therapies that reduce pressure on the 1st MTP joint and improve foot mechanics.
Bunion treatments include:
  • Footwear modification, i.e., avoiding tight shoes with a narrow or stiff toe box. Sometimes an orthopedic shoe may be recommended to accommodate wider width and depth
  • Anti-inflammatory medications, such as ibuprofen
  • Bunion splints: Splints are usually made of medical grade plastic with straps at the midfoot and big toe and are designed to straighten out the 1st MTP joint and hold it in place. Some may also incorporate a toe separator between the 1st and 2nd digits.
  • Bunion aligner: A thin sleeve for the foot that works to pull the big toe towards the mid-line of the body and bring it back to its natural position without taking up much room in the shoe.
  • Therapeutic taping: Taping the 1st MTP joint using athletic tape to keep it in place and discourage misalignment can help to manage pain and inflammation temporarily.
  • Padded shoe inserts
  • Shoe stretching: Shoes can be stretched in the areas where additional room is required without compromising the overall size of the shoe
  • Supportive insoles or custom orthotics

Bunion-friendly footwear, accommodated insoles, bunion splints, therapeutic tape, and shoe stretching are available in our foot clinic.To schedule best foot care appointment with our licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).Our Toronto foot clinic is open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm, Saturdays 10am-4pm. You do not need a referral to become a patient at our foot clinic.

What Causes Bunions?

Risk factors that may increase your chances of developing bunions:
  • Wearing overly tight, narrow, or pointy shoes
  • Wearing high heels
  • A family history of bunions
  • Ballet dancing
  • Occupations that require long hours on foot, such as teaching and nursing
  • Poor foot mechanics, such as overpronation
Bunions are more common in individuals who are:
  • Over the age of 65
  • Overweight
  • Female (bunions are 10X more common in women than men)
  • Have flat feet
  • Have arthritic conditions (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis)

How Do I Prevent Bunions?

Bunions are most likely to develop when susceptible feet are repeatedly squeezed into ill-fitting footwear. To prevent the development or progression of bunions, the most important thing you can do is choose footwear that fits correctly:
  • Avoid high heels
  • Avoid narrow and pointy-toed shoes
  • Flat and roomy shoes with a wide toe box are highly recommended
  • Utilize protective and supportive devices such as insoles or custom orthotics, which help reposition and realign the foot to prevent excessive pressure on the big toe joint and correct biomechanical abnormality
Most shoes on store shelves do not accommodate bunions and consequently exert excessive pressure on the protruding misaligned joint. If you need assistance choosing bunion-friendly footwear, Chiropodistour staff can assist you in selecting supportive and properly fitted orthopedic shoes, accommodative sandals, shoes, boots and specially modified footwear that conform to the unique physiology and biomechanical needs of your feet.

Plantar Wart

What Is A Plantar Wart?

A plantar wart is a common viral skin infection that appears as a small, rough growth resembling a cauliflower or solid blister on the sole of the foot. When these lesions are located on a weight bearing surface, they tend to grow inward and will build up hard tissue overtop of it, resembling a callus or corn. Plantar warts affect both children and adults.

What Are The Symptoms Of A Plantar Wart?

The most common symptoms of a plantar wart include:

  • Small, rough skin-coloured growth on the bottom of your foot or toe
  • Black dots (“wart seeds”) on the surface of your sole of your foot
  • Tenderness when walking or standing

Note: Warts can look similar to calluses and corns.

How Do I Treat A Plantar Wart?

While some warts may resolve on their own over time, there are some that require a visit to see a foot specialist.

There is not one treatment that will cure all warts on all people. People respond differently to different treatments, so it is important to find what treatment works best for you. In general, the more aggressive or invasive the treatment, the higher the success rate. Less invasive procedures will require multiple visits.

The following are some treatment options your chiropodist may discuss with you:

Salicylic Acid

Salicylic acid is a topical medication found in many over the counter products designed to help treat warts. It softens the skin and increases the speed at which the skin sheds its outer layer. Your chiropodist will prescribe a higher dosage of this medication to increase its effectiveness and will schedule regular visits to reduce build-up of skin and eventually peel off the wart. This treatment is relatively painless.

Canthacur/Canthacur PS

Canthacur is a potent topical solution when applied to the skin, will result in a burn and consequent blister, lifting the warty tissue from the top layer of the skin. Although in some cases there will be no distinct pain yet, the topical foot solution is still applied. Pain, discomfort, burning sensations may develop over the subsequent days that follow. On average, it takes roughly three applications to eradicate a wart with this method of treatment.

Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy involves multiple rounds of freezing and thawing warty tissue. This process theoretically kills living cells, including the virus and may even stimulate an immune response.

Needling

Needling is an invasive procedure which requires local anesthetic injections to numb the area. It then involves puncturing the warty lesion with a sterile needle approximately 100 times to introduce the virus to the immune system and stimulate an immune response. Needling is usually indicated for recalcitrant warts and individuals who have multiple warts on their foot. Treating one wart this way can lead to eradication of all other warts on the foot.

Excision

Excision is a technique used to treat resistant plantar warts and is known to have a high success rate. The foot is first numbed using local anesthetics and the wart is then cut out using a scalpel blade and removed from the top layer of the skin. The base is also cauterized to ensure no living viral tissue is left behind.

To schedule best foot care treatment with our licensed chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).

Our Toronto foot clinic is open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm, Saturdays 10am-4pm. You do not need a referral to become a patient at our foot clinic.

What Causes A Plantar Wart?

Plantar warts are caused by a strain of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) that infects the outermost layer of the skin on the soles of your feet. This virus may enter the skin when the skin is left vulnerable either by trauma, injury, or excessive moisture.

What Causes Plantar Warts?

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of getting a plantar wart:

  • Weakened or compromised immune system
  • Walking barefoot in public swimming pools, showers, gyms, locker rooms
  • Injury to the skin on the foot such as a cut or scrape

How Do I Prevent Plantar Warts?

Here are various foot care solutions preventing plantar warts:

Plantar warts aren’t nearly as contagious as fungal infections such as athlete’s foot, but you can minimize your risk of being exposed to the virus by:

  • Wearing protective footwear in locker rooms, change rooms, communal showers and fitness studios
  • Changing your shoes and socks daily
  • Avoiding sharing socks and shoes

Calluses

What Are Calluses?

A callus is an area of thickened, hardened skin on the underside of the foot. usually found where the foot bears weight. Calluses will cover a diffuse area and have a relatively equal thickness. The skin naturally goes through a process called keratinization in which the skin cells die off as it reaches the top layer. This is how dead skin forms. A callus will form when this process is stimulated into over-activity in response to excessive or repetitive forces.

What Are The Symptoms Of A Callus?

Symptoms of a foot callus include:

  • Area of abnormally hard skin
  • Vary in size and shape
  • Usually does not cause pain; however, may cause pain if too thick or skin breakdown underneath the callus is present

How Do I Treat Calluses?

Calluses can be removed during an appointment with one of our foot specialist or licensed chiropodist who will safely remove the build-up of tissue and assess whether shoe inserts or properly fitted custom orthotics may be indicated to prevent their recurrence.

If you have diabetes or another condition that causes poor circulation in your feet, promptly consult a chiropodist to avoid complications.

To schedule best foot care treatment with our licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).

Our Toronto foot clinic is open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm, Saturdays 10am-4pm. You do not need a referral to become a patient at our Foot clinic.

What Causes Calluses?

Calluses are often caused by ill-fitting footwear repeatedly rubbing against the soles of your feet. Biomechanical abnormalities can also lead to increased pressure in certain areas that can then develop callus.

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of developing calluses:

  • Bunions
  • Wearing shoes that are too loose or too tight
  • Wearing shoes without socks
  • Boney prominences
  • Misalignment of gait
  • Occupations or activities which require prolonged periods of weight bearing position
  • Loss of fat pad at the ball of the foot; common in elderly

How Do I Prevent Calluses?

Here are various foot care solutions you can do to prevent developing calluses on your feet:

  • Wear shoes that fit correctly and comfortably (e.g. orthopedic shoes with modified footwear)
  • Moisturize your feet regularly
  • Exfoliate your feet
  • Correct abnormal biomechanics via footwear modification and best custom foot orthotics

Ingrown Toenail 

What Is An Ingrown Toenail?

An ingrown toenail occurs when the side of the toenail curls down and pierces the flesh of the toe as the nail grows. Untreated ingrown toenails can easily become infected.

What Are The Symptoms Of An Ingrown Toenail?

The most common symptoms of an ingrown toenail are:

  • Pain (often severe) along the side(s) of your toenail
  • Redness around your toenail
  • Swelling of the tissue around your toenail

If pain and redness is accompanied by pus, this can indicate that an ingrown toenail has become infected.

While waiting for an appointment with a chiropodist to treat an infected ingrown toenail, the following may help to manage the infection and reduce pain:

  • Foot soaks in (Epsom) salt water bath
  • Gently clean the area of pus and blood
  • Apply sparing amounts of Polysporin ointment and cover with a bandage when going out
  • Wear shoes with a wide toebox to reduce pressures
  • Avoid injury and participation in sport activity which may exacerbate the problem
  • Do not cut the toenail yourself as it may make the problem worse or make it more difficult for the chiropodist to treat conservatively

How Do I Treat An Ingrown Toenail?

If you experience symptoms for more than three days, you should have your toenail assessed. To schedule best foot care treatment appointment with our licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338). You do not need a referral to become a patient at our foot clinic.

Ingrown toenail treatment may include:

  • Placing a spacer or splint under the ingrown edge of the toenail
  • Advising to soak feet in Epsom salt and water bath at home to flush out the infection and manage pain and inflammation
  • Trimming the ingrown portion of the nail
  • In recurrent cases, surgical removal (outpatient) of part of your toenail and the underlying nail bed
  • If your toenail becomes infected you may need topical or oral antibiotics

Rapid treatment by a foot care specialist is especially important for individuals with diabetes. If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can cause severe complications including:

  • Severe infection
  • Sepsis
  • Ulcers
  • Gangrene
  • Amputation

Sometimes, underlying biomechanical conditions can increase pressure on the toes and nails, which can lead to ingrowing nails. Correcting biomechanics with custom foot orthotics or orthopedic shoes following a biomechanical assessment and gait analysis may further relieve ingrown toe nails.

What Can Cause Ingrown Toenails?

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of getting an ingrown toenail:

  • Trimming your nails too short (particularly your big toenail)
  • Tapering or rounding your toenails
  • Excessive sweating (plantar hyperhidrosis)
  • Having flat feet
  • Wearing shoes that are too tight, short, or narrow
  • Naturally wide nails which can become difficult to trim
  • Genetics – naturally curved nails
  • Injury to the toenail

How Do I Prevent An Ingrown Toenail?

In order to prevent ingrown toenails:

  • Avoid shoes that crowd your toes
  • Trim your toenails straight across and file the corners
  • Avoid injury to your toenails

Fungal Toenail

What Is Toenail Fungus?

Fungi are naturally present on and in the body, but when it begins to overgrow you can develop an infection. Fungal infections can develop anywhere on the body, but the feet are especially prone to fungal infection because our shoes provide a dark, warm, and moist environment in which fungus can thrive. One such infection is tinea pedis, also known as athlete’s foot, a fungal infection affecting the skin of the feet. Another is onychomycosis (tinea unguium), a fungal infection that can affect part of a toenail, a whole toenail, or several toenails.

What Are The Symptoms Of Fungal Toenails?

The most common sign of a fungal nail infection is the development of white or yellow spots that present most commonly as:

  • Yellowing and thickening of surface of the toenail
  • Brittleness, crumbling or flaking on or below the surface of the toenail
  • Unpleasant odors stemming from the nail or surrounding skin

How Do I Treat Fungal Toenails?

Fungal toenails are generally more difficult to treat than athlete’s foot, with over-the-counter topical antifungal ointments not reliably eradicating infection. Better penetration of topical antifungal medications and regular nail debridement where the nail will be significantly reduced in thickness by a chiropodist is necessary. In some cases, an oral prescription of antifungal medication will be required.*Moisture-control socks, shoes, and sandals are available in our Toronto foot clinic.

*To schedule best foot care treatment with our licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).

Our Toronto foot clinic is open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm, Saturdays 10am-4pm. You do not need a referral to become a patient at our Foot clinic.

What Causes Toenail Fungus?

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of developing fungal toenails:

  • Infection can develop following a toenail injury
  • The elderly have the highest risk of developing fungal toenails because as we age, our toenails get brittle and fungus can enter through cracks
  • Nail infections are more common in men than women
  • Walking barefoot in communal swimming pools, gyms, yoga studios, showers, and locker rooms
  • An existing athlete’s foot infection
  • Reduced circulation in the feet due to conditions like peripheral vascular disease or diabetes

How Do I Prevent Fungal Toenails?

Here are various foot care solutions you can do to prevent fungal infection of your toenails:

  • When having a pedicure, always ask how and how often the salon staff sanitizes their tools – pedicure tools such as nail clippers can spread toenail fungus from person to person if they are not properly disinfected between uses.  Steam sterilization is the gold standard for infection control and is required by foot care professionals such as chiropodists and podiatrists.
  • Wear moisture-wicking socks and change your socks midday if you have sweaty feet
  • Wear shoes made from breathable materials
  • Wear protective footwear when visiting public pools, gyms, yoga studios, and locker rooms
  • Thoroughly dry your feet and in between your toes after showering and before putting on your socks and shoes
  • Air out athletic shoes after use to ensure they thoroughly dry before the next wear

Moisture-control socks, shoes, and sandals are available in our clinic store, open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm and Saturday 10am-4pm.

Plantar Fasciitis

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

The plantar fascia is a thick connective tissue structure that runs from your heel to your toes and supports the arch of your foot. Plantar fasciitis is a painful condition that can develop when this fascia becomes irritated or inflamed. It is one of the most common causes of heel pain.

What Are The Symptoms Of Plantar Fasciitis?

The most common symptom of plantar fasciitis is sharp or stabbing pain on the underside of your heel when standing or walking. For others causes of heel pain see heel spur or Achilles tendonitis.

How Do I Treat Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis treatment may include:

  • Stretching and strengthening exercises
  • Rest
  • Rolling a tennis ball or frozen water bottle under the foot
  • Wearing a splint or boot cast
  • Properly fitted best custom orthotics or orthopedic shoes
  • Elastic therapeutic tape
  • Over-the-counter insoles or modified insoles
  • Taking ill-fitting footwear out of rotation

If you have persistent heel pain, schedule a diagnostic assessment with our own licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).

Our Toronto foot clinic is open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm, Saturdays 10am-4pm. You do not need a referral to become a patient at our Foot clinic.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the long fascial structure that runs between your toes and heels becomes strained, leading to micro-tears in the fascia and pain under the heel.

What Risk Factors Are Associated With Plantar Fasciitis?

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of developing plantar fasciitis:

  • Flimsy footwear: wearing shoes with soft soles that don’t adequately absorb shock while you walk
  • High-impact sports: Certain types of exercise put extra stress on the plantar fascia including long-distance running, ballet, and high intensity interval training
  • Arch abnormalities: having flat feet or high arches
  • Faulty foot mechanics
  • Long hours on foot: working a job that requires you to be on your feet for a prolonged period of time, i.e. teachers, nurses, restaurant servers and factory workers (see Who We Treat)
  • Increased body mass index

How Do I Prevent Plantar Fasciitis?

In order to prevent plantar fasciitis and heel pain, here are various foot care solutions to consider:

  • Wear supportive shoes with good shock absorption and arch support
  • Avoid high heels
  • Replace worn-out running shoes
  • Switch to lower-impact sports such as cycling or swimming
  • Routinely stretch your arches, Achilles tendons, and calves
  • Maintain a healthy body weight

Our clinic store is open six days a week and offers a large selection of supportive footwear, athletic shoes, and sneakers (see What’s In Store). If you need assistance choosing shoes, drop-in shoe fitting is offered during clinic hours Monday-Friday and is a complimentary service.

Achilles Tendonitis

What Is Achilles Tendonitis?

The Achilles tendon is the longest tendon in the body, connecting the calf muscles to the heel bone. The calf muscles consist of two muscles, the gastrocnemius muscle and the soleus muscle. If your Achilles tendon is overused or under repetitive stress you can develop tendonitis, characterized by inflammation and pain of the tendon.

What Are The Symptoms Of Achilles Tendonitis?

The most common symptom of Achilles tendonitis is a mild ache or pain in the back of the lower-leg or above the heel, especially first thing in the morning and after exercise. The tendon can also be warm, swollen and irritated with certain ankle movements.

How Do I Treat Achilles Tendonitis?

Achilles tendonitis treatment may include:

  • Strengthening and stretching exercises
  • Rest or decrease in activities
  • Custom orthotics that slightly elevate your heel
  • Over-the-counter insoles that increase cushioning under your heel

If you have persistent heel or ankle pain, schedule a diagnostic assessment with our foot specialists to identify the cause of pain.

To schedule best foot care treatment appointment with our licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).

Our Toronto foot clinic is open six days a week. We offer a large selection of supportive footwear, sneakers, and cushioning insoles (see What’s In Store) for Achilles tendonitis.

You do not need a referral to become a patient at our Foot clinic.

What Causes Achilles Tendonitis?

Achilles tendonitis develops when the Achilles tendon becomes swollen and inflamed due to persistent intense strain on the tendon. Without proper treatment, Achilles tendonitis can turn into Achilles tendonosis, which leads to thickening, scarring and weakness of the tendon over time. Tendonosis is due to small micro tears developing within the tendon without inflammation and can be even more difficult to treat than tendonitis. Often, nearby structures including the paratenon or retrocalcaneal bursa can be the cause of the problem, so it is important to have a foot specialist treat the condition appropriately.

For another common cause of heel pain see plantar fasciitis.

If you have persistent heel or ankle pain, schedule a diagnostic assessment with our practice to identify the cause of pain. To schedule an assessment use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338). You do not need a referral to become a patient at our clinic.

Risk Factors

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of developing Achilles tendonitis:

  • Running
  • Sports that involve jumping or hopping such as tennis and basketball
  • Sports that involve quick stop-and-go motions such as football and soccer
  • Flat feet
  • Tight calf muscles
  • Running in worn-out sneakers
  • Wearing shoes with elevated heels for long periods of time

How Do I Prevent Achilles Tendonitis?

There are a number of things you can do to prevent Achilles tendonitis:

  • Gradually increase activity level (duration and intensity) if starting or modifying an exercise regimen
  • Properly warm up prior to exercise
  • Stretch your calves daily
  • Stretch your calves before and after exercise
  • Combine high-impact sports with low-impact activities such as cycling and swimming
  • Replace worn out running shoes
  • Avoid wearing shoes with excessively high heels

Diabetes

Why Is Foot Care Important for People With Diabetes?

All patients with diabetes should obtain an annual comprehensive foot examination by a licensed chiropodist to identify risk factors predictive of ulcers and amputations. In patients with diabetes, increased blood glucose can impair blood flow, compromise the immune system, slow down healing and cause decreased sensation (neuropathy) in the feet and toes. As a result, common foot problems can lead to serious complications. At your appointment, your chiropodist will check for adequate circulation, any signs of neuropathy, risk for foot ulcers, and manage any nail and skin concerns. Put your feet in the hands of a health care professional to reduce the risk of infection and diabetic complications.

How Can Diabetes Affect Your Feet?

In people with diabetes, common foot problems can cause serious complications:

  • Loss of sensation (Neuropathy)
    Diabetes can cause nerve damage that reduces sensation in your feet. With a diminished ability to feel pressure, pain, or changes in temperature you may not notice if your feet or toenails become injured.
  • Foot Infection
    Benign foot injuries often become infected. Diabetes can cause decreased blood flow in your feet, which prolongs healing time and impairs your body’s ability to effectively fight off infection in the area. Combined with a reduced ability to feel pain and detect an injury, poor circulation can lead a cut or scratch to become further inflamed or infected, even without you noticing.
  • Foot Ulcers
    Because wounds heal slower (and progress faster), a common foot condition like a blister or cut can quickly turn into an ulcer. An ulcer is an open sore that is slow to heal and may reoccur. Ulcers are particularly common in people with diabetes due to high blood sugar levels impairing blood flow to the area and compromising the body’s immune system: it is estimated that up to a quarter of people with diabetes will develop a foot ulcer.
  • Musculoskeletal Dysfunction
    Nerve damage can also effect the ability of your foot muscles to work properly, which can disturb normal gait. If there is too much concentrated pressure in one area of the foot you may develop blisters, calluses, or corns.
  • Gangrene
    Tissue in your body can die if it doesn’t get enough oxygen. If peripheral vascular disease severely reduces blood flow to your feet, they won’t receive enough oxygen-rich blood and irreversible damages may follow. Gangrene is a medical emergency.
  • Amputation
    If an infection cannot be contained and spreads to the bone, the foot or leg may need to be amputated.

Contact your doctor immediately if you have diabetes and your feet display any of the following: 

  • Skin change, i.e., a new callus, blister, or ingrown toenail
  • Colour change
  • Temperature change
  • Swelling
  • Tingling or burning
  • An open or infected sore

To schedule a diabetes foot exam, use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338). You do not need a physician’s referral.

What Can Cause Diabetic Foot Complications?

Certain risk factors may increase your chances of diabetic foot complications:

  • Poor blood glucose control
  • Poor hygiene
  • Receiving nail care from nail salons that do not use sterilized instruments
  • Foot injury
  • Wearing ill-fitting shoes -ie shoes that are too tight
  • Lack of awareness or failure or seek diabetic foot education from a licensed chiropodist

How Do I Treat Diabetic Foot Complications?

Treatment for pain and complications resulting from diabetes may include:

  • Diabetic foot assessment
  • Nail care and callus care
  • Prescribed medication if indicated
  • Advise on proper footwear and custom foot insoles
  • Measuring for and dispending medical grade compression stockings
  • Orthopedic footwear
  • Wound care including wound debridement and application of proper dressings to facilitate healing and manage or prevent infection
  • Diabetic foot education

How Do I Prevent Complications?

Promptly identifying and treating skin and toenail problems is critical for preventing complications. With routine skin, foot, and nail care and diligent foot monitoring, you can reduce your risk of serious complications or prevent them entirely.

Prevention measures include:

  • Annual or semi-annual foot assessment by a foot care specialist that includes a thorough examination that checks for and treats:
    • Blisters
    • Calluses
    • Corns
    • Fungal toenails
    • Athlete’s foot
    • Dry skin
    • Cracked heels
    • Foot sores or ulcers
    • Hammertoes
    • Ingrown toenails
    • Sensation
  • Wash (not soak) your feet daily with warm, soapy water
  • Dry your feet thoroughly after bathing or taking a shower – do not forget in between the toes
  • Check your feet daily for injuries
  • Moisturize your feet if they become dry to prevent cracking
  • Trim your toenails once per month – if you cannot safely trim your nails, schedule a diabetes nail care appointment with one of our practitioners
  • Wear compression socks to help improve circulation in the feet and lower legs
  • Wear closed-toe orthopaedic shoes with a roomy toe-box, flexible fabric upper, and soft breathable lining to minimize rubbing and pressure that can lead to blisters, calluses, and corns
  • Avoid wearing sandals or walking barefoot
  • Wearing moisture-wicking socks to control sweat levels that might exacerbate athlete’s foot or blister-causing friction
  • Wearing white socks makes it easier to notice blood or other signs of broken skin

Diabetic care products including orthopedic shoes, compression stockings, medical creams, and foot care tools are available in our Toronto foot clinic.

To schedule best foot care treatment appointment with our licensed Chiropodists (foot specialists), use the booking form below or call 416-769-FEET(3338).

Our Toronto foot clinic is open Monday-Friday 10am-7pm, Saturdays 10am-4pm. You do not need a referral to become a patient at our Foot clinic.

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